Ideas. Cities. Social Innovation.

That may not seem like a lot, but it translates into an estimated $600 million in additional economic activity, and that increased economic activity means more jobs. In the table, the final two rows model what we might expect in increased employment as a result of this boost to regional economic activity, after controlling for any decrease in corporate profits. New York stands to gain about 4,700 payroll jobs, or about 5,200 full-time equivalent jobs (essentially accounting for the additional hours that some currently employed workers will receive). Obviously, these job numbers will not be a silver bullet for solving any state’s employment problems, but an additional several thousand jobs—at no added cost to state budgets—certainly would help.

Affordability seems to be a problem, but otherwise Montclair seems to offer a lot of lessons for what a model suburb can look like:

The township has also benefited from New Jersey Transit’s Midtown Direct train service begun 10 years ago. The new service increased Montclair’s desirability with commuters, giving them the option of a one-seat ride in as little as 30 minutes to Manhattan’s Penn Station in addition to service to Hoboken Terminal.

Numerous restaurants have sprung up in Montclair in recent years and the town continues to attract families who are drawn to the town’s school system. Montclair State University is in the northern portion of the town, with part of its campus also in neighboring Little Falls.

In the end, the demands and interests of many of the homeless residents in the neighborhood and the businesses are not far apart. Each wants space and safety to live and work freely in the neighborhood.

"Imagine if you have a creative, community approach and could connect housing people with access to jobs," said Tom Angotti, a professor of urban affairs at Hunter who sees both the placement of the shelter and the existence of IBZs as different sides of the same debate. "Imagine finding a way to integrate industrial development into neighborhoods, where this wouldn’t be an issue."

Taking the above two narratives together, the United States is reduced to New York City and its impressive sphere of influence. Globalization for the United States is Greater Greater New York City. Both Philadelphia and DC benefit from their proximity to NYC. The rest of America is flyover country.

An anarchist meeting in Union Square, from 1914. They look so civil.

An anarchist meeting in Union Square, from 1914. They look so civil.

A Neighbourhood Book Exchange in Vancouver, via the Edmonton Community Foundation’s Facebook page.
The link to their facebook post has some examples of similar initiatives happening in other cities too.

A Neighbourhood Book Exchange in Vancouver, via the Edmonton Community Foundation’s Facebook page.

The link to their facebook post has some examples of similar initiatives happening in other cities too.

"The days of the smoke stacks are gone," says Andrew Kimball, president of the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation (BNYDC). But it’s clear from the 300 acres and 40 buildings he leases to small and medium-size businesses at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, that manufacturing isn’t.

How the Brooklyn Navy Yard Became the National Model for Creating Manufacturing Jobs.

What is at stake? A Duane Reade or a Walgreens offers the same foodstuffs and round-the-clock hours, with lower prices and prescription pills. I can recognize that my preference for bodegas over such pharmacies is born, in equal measures, of the desire to be “authentic” and the recognition that I’m plainly not. I want to belong in this city I didn’t grow up in; I want to call a bodega mine and have the guy behind the counter know what kind I smoke, even if he won’t talk to me. Even better! That’s so New York!

Years ago the critic Ada Louise Huxtable noted that at the turn of the last century the president of the Pennsylvania Railroad, Alexander Cassatt, wanted to build a hotel atop Penn Station to exploit valuable air rights. But his architect, McKim, talked him out of it. The railroad owed the city a “thoroughly and distinctly monumental gateway,” McKim argued. Idealism temporarily triumphed over commerce, until McKim’s great building, across several troubled decades, became an increasingly rundown emblem of urban glory and gave way to an architecture of gloomy pragmatism and moneyed interests.

There is historic justice in trying to rectify a crime committed a half-century ago that galvanized the architectural preservation movement. “One entered the city like a god; one scuttles in now like a rat,” is the familiar lament from Vincent J. Scully Jr., the Yale architectural historian, about the difference between the former and present Penn Stations.