Ideas. Cities. Social Innovation.

Great piece, and argument for preserving old newspaper shacks:

Edmonton once had dozens of paperboy shacks where boys gathered daily to collect their stacks of Edmonton Journals for evening delivery, but now only a handful of the distinctive, squat sheds remain – and there are no plans to preserve any of them.

“Unfortunately in Edmonton they tear everything down,” said John Tiemessen, who owns a property at 10265 95 Street where one of the city’s last remaining shacks sits forgotten between two shuttered businesses (right). He’d hoped Fort Edmonton Park might preserve the shack, but the park has concluded it isn’t old enough. “I think it’s an absolute shame,” he said.

Source: Newspaper Sales Slid to 1984 Levels in 2011.

The newspaper industry lagged the performance of all the other traditional media in 2011. Kantar Media, an independent market research firm, reports that television ad sales last year rose 2.4%, magazine sales fell 0.4% and radio sales slipped 0.6%.The only category where sales increased at newspapers in 2011 was digital, where revenues grew 3.1% in the fourth quarter and 6.8% for the 12 months to produce $3.2 billion in annual sales.

Source: Newspaper Sales Slid to 1984 Levels in 2011.

The newspaper industry lagged the performance of all the other traditional media in 2011. Kantar Media, an independent market research firm, reports that television ad sales last year rose 2.4%, magazine sales fell 0.4% and radio sales slipped 0.6%.

The only category where sales increased at newspapers in 2011 was digital, where revenues grew 3.1% in the fourth quarter and 6.8% for the 12 months to produce $3.2 billion in annual sales.

Steve Fainaru, a former Post reporter who worked extensively with Shadid in Iraq and also won a Pulitzer for his own work, recalled himhttp://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/correspondent-anthony-shadid-43-dies-in-syria/2012/02/16/gIQAo2NyIR_story_1.html as “the best journalist I’d ever seen — without any question.”

“He wrote poetry on deadline,” Fainaru said. “What made him so great as a journalist [was that] he was able to somehow find compassion and empathy in everything he touched and wrote about.”

Jill Abramson, the executive editor, informed the newspaper’s staff Thursday evening in an e-mail. “Anthony died as he lived — determined to bear witness to the transformation sweeping the Middle East and to testify to the suffering of people caught between government oppression and opposition forces,” she wrote.